Buildings to go orange for suicide prevention day


Thousands of people across the country will also switch on an orange coloured light bulb in their homes at 9pm to show their support for the initiative
What can you do? First, talk about suicide. Don’t be afraid to tell people that you knew or loved someone who attempted or died by suicide. Even if you don’t know someone personally, don’t be afraid to talk to people when you find out they have experienced a loss to suicide. Their grief is probably difficult and they might be used to getting hurtful answers or hiding their loss. Being open and honest about suicide helps people realize that this leading cause of death is something that affects so many of us. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2016/09/impact-awareness-suicide-prevention-day/#sthash.9RMnKnHx.dpuf
What can you do? First, talk about suicide. Don’t be afraid to tell people that you knew or loved someone who attempted or died by suicide. Even if you don’t know someone personally, don’t be afraid to talk to people when you find out they have experienced a loss to suicide. Their grief is probably difficult and they might be used to getting hurtful answers or hiding their loss. Being open and honest about suicide helps people realize that this leading cause of death is something that affects so many of us. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2016/09/impact-awareness-suicide-prevention-day/#sthash.9RMnKnHx.dpuf
What can you do? First, talk about suicide. Don’t be afraid to tell people that you knew or loved someone who attempted or died by suicide. Even if you don’t know someone personally, don’t be afraid to talk to people when you find out they have experienced a loss to suicide. Their grief is probably difficult and they might be used to getting hurtful answers or hiding their loss. Being open and honest about suicide helps people realize that this leading cause of death is something that affects so many of us. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2016/09/impact-awareness-suicide-prevention-day/#sthash.9RMnKnHx.dpuf

There is no blueprint for how we react to and cope after a suicide.  We each have our own relationship with the person who died and we all grieve in our own way and at our own pace.

When someone grieves in a different way to you, it doesn’t mean that they don’t care – they are just finding their own way to cope.  But it can be hard if they behave in a way that you can’t relate to.  It can also be difficult to express our own grief around others if they are reacting differently, especially if those people also had a close relationship with the person who died.

Patience and understanding is helpful and it important that you try and find somewhere you can share your feelings.  And remember that there is support available from others from outside friends and family – this can provide a space to “be yourself” without having to worry about how others will react.

What can you do? First, talk about suicide. Don’t be afraid to tell people that you knew or loved someone who attempted or died by suicide. Even if you don’t know someone personally, don’t be afraid to talk to people when you find out they have experienced a loss to suicide. Their grief is probably difficult and they might be used to getting hurtful answers or hiding their loss. Being open and honest about suicide helps people realize that this leading cause of death is something that affects so many of us. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2016/09/impact-awareness-suicide-prevention-day/#sthash.9RMnKnHx.dpuf

Check-in Date:

Check-out Date: